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Fujifilm's new X-A5 adds phase-detect AF and 4K video capture

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 21:00
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Fujifilm has introduced its budget-friendly X-A5 mirrorless camera – the follow-up to the X-A3. The 24MP APS-C sensor (which uses the traditional Bayer color filter, rather than X-Trans) X-A5 appears to address the weak spots of its predecessor, namely sluggish performance and a so-so autofocus system. The updated processor on the X-A5 is 1.5x times faster, according to Fujifilm, and its phase-detect AF system should do a better job with subject tracking.

Fujifilm boasts of better scene recognition and color/skin tone reproduction, and battery life has increased to an impressive 450 shots/charge (CIPA standard). The X-A5 also has Bluetooth for easy pairing and image transfer, up to 5 minutes of 4K video capture (albeit at 15 fps) and two new Advanced Filters: Fog Remove and HDR Art. A jack for an external microphone has also been added.

The X-A5 will be bundled with the new XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 OIS Power Zoom lens for $599 and will begin shipping in early February. Color choices include silver & black, silver & brown and silver & pink.

Press Release:

FUJIFILM ANNOUNCES THE NEW X-A5 – THE LIGHTEST CAMERA-ZOOM LENS COMBINATION IN THE X SERIES LINEUP

Featuring an enhanced sensor, newly developed zoom lens, the latest Bluetooth® technology, and 4K video recording, the X-A5 delivers outstanding image quality and ease of use

Valhalla, N.Y., January 31, 2018 FUJIFILM North America Corporation is excited to announce the new FUJIFILM X-A5 Digital Camera Body with XC15-45mm Lens Kit, the lightest camera-zoom lens combination within the X Series lineup. With a host of new and improved features, the X-A5 kit debuts the new FUJINON XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ, the first electric powered zoom lens for X Mount digital cameras. Available in three colors of synthetic leather, the X-A5 is equipped with the latest Bluetooth® technology for quick and easy image transfer and allows for a broader range of video capabilities with its 4K output.

“The X-A5 packs Fujifilm’s renowned image quality and exciting fun features in a compact, lightweight body,” says Yuji Igarashi, General Manager of the Electronic Imaging Division & Optical Devices Division at FUJIFILM North America Corporation. “We are excited to bring a user-friendly camera that can capture great images, to the market at an affordable price.”

Featuring an Enhanced Sensor and Color Reproduction Technology

The X-A5 features a powerful 24.2MP APS-C sensor equipped with phase detection autofocus and a newly developed image processing engine with a processing speed 1.5 times faster than that of previous models. Combined with Fujifilm’s renowned color reproduction technology, the X-A5 achieves outstanding image quality and outperforms previous models in its scene recognition accuracy and skin tone reproduction, making it perfect for portraits.

The X-A5 is the first in the X-A series to feature phase detection pixels, and an intelligent Hybrid AF system that focuses twice as fast as previous models to ensure capture of swiftly moving subjects. With an ISO sensitivity range now up to ISO12800 and extended sensitivity range up to ISO51200, camera shake and noise are significantly reduced even in low-light conditions.

New Compact and Lightweight Electric Powered Zoom Lens

The new X-A5 introduces the first electric powered zoom lens for X Mount cameras, the FUJINON XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ. With a minimum working distance of just 2 inches, this lightweight and compact lens is great for achieving clear close-up shots while making the photographic experience easy and comfortable. Capable of capturing crisp, intricate textures, the XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ is ideal for food and macro photography. Starting at a wide angle, this smooth electric-powered zoom also allows for great freedom in composition framing.

The new XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ lens will also be available for standalone purchase as a portable addition for existing X Series users.

Equipped with 4K Video Capabilities

The X-A5 features a variety of 4K video capabilities. Utilizing the Burst Function, users are able to shoot 15 frames per second in 4K image quality, ensuring that photo opportunities are never missed. Offering an HD video function to record videos up to quad speed for slow motion clips and a Multi Focus Mode which stacks 4K quality images and automatically changes the depth of field setting, the X-A5 is the perfect companion for a wide range of creative captures.

Bluetooth® Pairing Technology for Easy Image Transfer

Featuring the latest Bluetooth® technology, the X-A5 allows for automatic transfer of images and videos to paired smart devices using the free “FUJIFILM Camera Remote” app. The camera is compatible with Instax Share™ Printers to instantly transfer and print images directly from the camera.

Film Simulation Modes and Improved User Interface for Ease of Operation

The X-A5 allows for artistic expression through Fujifilm’s unique Film Simulation Modes that boast the company’s advances in color reproduction. Offering eleven different modes, users can add a creative twist to their images. In addition, the camera offers seventeen variations of Advanced Filters including the new “Fog Remove” and “HDR Art.”

An improved user interface allows for superior ease of use. The large LCD screen uses new touch-panel GUI, facilitating intuitive operation and is capable of rotating 180 degrees, making the X-A5 perfect for taking high quality self-portraits. When the panel is rotated 180 degrees, the Rear Command Dial switches to the Zoom and Shutter Release function and automatically activates the Eye AF function for sharp focus on the subject’s eyes. Additionally, the Portrait Enhancer Mode allows for users to select from three levels of skin tone enhancement with easy touchscreen operation.

FUJIFILM X-A5 Key Features:

  • 24.2MP APS-C CMOS sensor and newly developed processor equipped with phase detection AF system
  • FUJINON XC15-45mmF3.5- 5.6 OIS PZ wide angle electric-powered zoom lens with minimum working distance of 2”
  • 3” (approx. 1,040K-dot) high resolution LCD touchscreen using new touch-panel GUI can be tilted to 180°
    • Portrait Enhancement Level, Touch AF in Movie Mode, Advanced Filter Select
  • Standard output sensitivity of ISO200 – ISO12800
    • Extended output sensitivity: ISO100 – ISO51200
  • 4K video recording up to approx. 5 mins
    • Full HD 1920 x 1080 59.94p / 50p / 24p / 23.98p; continuous recording up to approx.14 mins
    • HD 1280 x 720 59.94p / 50p / 24p / 23.98p; continuous recording up to approx. 27 mins
    • High Speed Movie 1280x720 1.6x / 2x / 3.3x / 4x
  • Bluetooth® version 4.1 low energy technology
  • In-camera RAW processing
  • New Advanced Filters: “Fog Remove” and “HDR Art”
  • Wi-Fi® image transfer and remote camera operation
  • Improved battery life for still images - approx. 450 frames
  • Improved start-up period:
    • 0.4 sec., when High Performance mode set to ON
    • 0.8 sec., when High Performance mode set to OFF
  • Photos can be sent to instax SHARE printers using the free instax SHARE App (iOS and Android)
  • Accessories include:
    • Li-ion battery NP-W126S
    • AC power adapter
    • Plug adapter
    • USB cable
    • Shoulder strap
    • Body cap
    • Owner's manual

Availability and Pricing

The new FUJIFILM X-A5 Camera Kit will be available on February 8, 2018 in the U.S. and Canada for USD $599.95 and CAD $749.99.

The new standalone XC15-45mmF3.5- 5.6 OIS PZ Lens will be available on March 15, 2018 in the U.S. and Canada for USD $299.95 and CAD $379.99.

Fujifilm X-A5 specifications PriceMSRP$599 (with 15-45mm PZ lens)Body typeBody typeRangefinder-style mirrorlessSensorMax resolution6000 x 4000Image ratio w:h1:1, 3:2, 16:9Effective pixels24 megapixelsSensor sizeAPS-C (23.5 x 15.7 mm)Sensor typeCMOSColor spacesRGB, Adobe RGBColor filter arrayPrimary color filterImageISOAuto, 200-12800 (expandable to 100-51200)Boosted ISO (minimum)100Boosted ISO (maximum)51200White balance presets7Custom white balanceYes (3 slots)Image stabilizationNoUncompressed formatRAWJPEG quality levelsFine, NormalFile format
  • JPEG (Exif Ver 2.3)
  • RAW (Fujifilm RAF format)
Optics & FocusAutofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Phase Detect
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Tracking
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampYesDigital zoomYesManual focusYesNumber of focus points91Lens mountFujifilm XFocal length multiplier1.5×Screen / viewfinderArticulated LCDTiltingScreen size3″Screen dots1,040,000Touch screenYesScreen typeTFT LCDLive viewYesViewfinder typeNonePhotography featuresMinimum shutter speed30 secMaximum shutter speed1/4000 secMaximum shutter speed (electronic)1/32000 secExposure modes
  • Program AE
  • Shutter Priority
  • Aperture Priority
  • Manual
Built-in flashYesFlash range5.70 m (at ISO 200)External flashYesFlash modesAuto, flash on, flash off, slow synchro, rear-curtain synchro, commanderFlash X sync speed1/180 secDrive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Self-timer
Continuous drive6.0 fpsSelf-timerYes (2 or 10 secs)Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Average
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±5 (at 1/3 EV steps)AE Bracketing±3 (3 frames at 1/3 EV, 2/3 EV, 1 EV steps)WB BracketingYesVideography featuresResolutions3840 x 2160 (15p), 1920 x 1080 (60, 50, 24, 23.98p), 1280 x 720 (60p, 50p, 24p, 23.98p)FormatMPEG-4, H.264MicrophoneStereoSpeakerMonoStorageStorage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC card (UHS-I supported)ConnectivityUSB USB 2.0 (480 Mbit/sec)USB chargingYesHDMIYes (mini-HDMI)Microphone portYesHeadphone portNoWirelessBuilt-InWireless notes802.11b/g/n + Bluetooth 4.1 LERemote controlYes (Wired or via smartphone)PhysicalEnvironmentally sealedNoBatteryBattery PackBattery descriptionNP-W126S lithium-ion battery & USB chargerBattery Life (CIPA)450Weight (inc. batteries)361 g (0.80 lb / 12.73 oz)Dimensions117 x 68 x 40 mm (4.61 x 2.68 x 1.57″)Other featuresOrientation sensorYesTimelapse recordingYesGPSNone
Categories: Photo News

Fujifilm introduces XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 lens, its first X-series power zoom

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 21:00
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Fujifilm has announced its first power zoom lens for X-series cameras: the XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 OIS PZ. This compact, stabilized lens is equivalent to 23-69mm on Fuji's X-series cameras, such as the new X-A5 with which it will be kitted. It has a minimum focus distance of 5 cm, a length of 44mm (1.7") when fully collapsed and a weight of just 136 g (4.8 oz).

The XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 OIS PZ comes in silver and black and will ship in early February for $299.

Press Release:

FUJIFILM ANNOUNCES THE NEW X-A5 – THE LIGHTEST CAMERA-ZOOM LENS COMBINATION IN THE X SERIES LINEUP

Featuring an enhanced sensor, newly developed zoom lens, the latest Bluetooth® technology, and 4K video recording, the X-A5 delivers outstanding image quality and ease of use

Valhalla, N.Y., January 31, 2018 FUJIFILM North America Corporation is excited to announce the new FUJIFILM X-A5 Digital Camera Body with XC15-45mm Lens Kit, the lightest camera-zoom lens combination within the X Series lineup. With a host of new and improved features, the X-A5 kit debuts the new FUJINON XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ, the first electric powered zoom lens for X Mount digital cameras. Available in three colors of synthetic leather, the X-A5 is equipped with the latest Bluetooth® technology for quick and easy image transfer and allows for a broader range of video capabilities with its 4K output.

“The X-A5 packs Fujifilm’s renowned image quality and exciting fun features in a compact, lightweight body,” says Yuji Igarashi, General Manager of the Electronic Imaging Division & Optical Devices Division at FUJIFILM North America Corporation. “We are excited to bring a user-friendly camera that can capture great images, to the market at an affordable price.”

Featuring an Enhanced Sensor and Color Reproduction Technology

The X-A5 features a powerful 24.2MP APS-C sensor equipped with phase detection autofocus and a newly developed image processing engine with a processing speed 1.5 times faster than that of previous models. Combined with Fujifilm’s renowned color reproduction technology, the X-A5 achieves outstanding image quality and outperforms previous models in its scene recognition accuracy and skin tone reproduction, making it perfect for portraits.

The X-A5 is the first in the X-A series to feature phase detection pixels, and an intelligent Hybrid AF system that focuses twice as fast as previous models to ensure capture of swiftly moving subjects. With an ISO sensitivity range now up to ISO12800 and extended sensitivity range up to ISO51200, camera shake and noise are significantly reduced even in low-light conditions.

New Compact and Lightweight Electric Powered Zoom Lens

The new X-A5 introduces the first electric powered zoom lens for X Mount cameras, the FUJINON XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ. With a minimum working distance of just 2 inches, this lightweight and compact lens is great for achieving clear close-up shots while making the photographic experience easy and comfortable. Capable of capturing crisp, intricate textures, the XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ is ideal for food and macro photography. Starting at a wide angle, this smooth electric-powered zoom also allows for great freedom in composition framing.

The new XC15-45mmF3.5-5.6 OIS PZ lens will also be available for standalone purchase as a portable addition for existing X Series users.

Equipped with 4K Video Capabilities

The X-A5 features a variety of 4K video capabilities. Utilizing the Burst Function, users are able to shoot 15 frames per second in 4K image quality, ensuring that photo opportunities are never missed. Offering an HD video function to record videos up to quad speed for slow motion clips and a Multi Focus Mode which stacks 4K quality images and automatically changes the depth of field setting, the X-A5 is the perfect companion for a wide range of creative captures.

Bluetooth® Pairing Technology for Easy Image Transfer

Featuring the latest Bluetooth® technology, the X-A5 allows for automatic transfer of images and videos to paired smart devices using the free “FUJIFILM Camera Remote” app. The camera is compatible with Instax Share™ Printers to instantly transfer and print images directly from the camera.

Film Simulation Modes and Improved User Interface for Ease of Operation

The X-A5 allows for artistic expression through Fujifilm’s unique Film Simulation Modes that boast the company’s advances in color reproduction. Offering eleven different modes, users can add a creative twist to their images. In addition, the camera offers seventeen variations of Advanced Filters including the new “Fog Remove” and “HDR Art.”

An improved user interface allows for superior ease of use. The large LCD screen uses new touch-panel GUI, facilitating intuitive operation and is capable of rotating 180 degrees, making the X-A5 perfect for taking high quality self-portraits. When the panel is rotated 180 degrees, the Rear Command Dial switches to the Zoom and Shutter Release function and automatically activates the Eye AF function for sharp focus on the subject’s eyes. Additionally, the Portrait Enhancer Mode allows for users to select from three levels of skin tone enhancement with easy touchscreen operation.

FUJIFILM X-A5 Key Features:

  • 24.2MP APS-C CMOS sensor and newly developed processor equipped with phase detection AF system
  • FUJINON XC15-45mmF3.5- 5.6 OIS PZ wide angle electric-powered zoom lens with minimum working distance of 2”
  • 3” (approx. 1,040K-dot) high resolution LCD touchscreen using new touch-panel GUI can be tilted to 180°
    • Portrait Enhancement Level, Touch AF in Movie Mode, Advanced Filter Select
  • Standard output sensitivity of ISO200 – ISO12800
    • Extended output sensitivity: ISO100 – ISO51200
  • 4K video recording up to approx. 5 mins
    • Full HD 1920 x 1080 59.94p / 50p / 24p / 23.98p; continuous recording up to approx.14 mins
    • HD 1280 x 720 59.94p / 50p / 24p / 23.98p; continuous recording up to approx. 27 mins
    • High Speed Movie 1280x720 1.6x / 2x / 3.3x / 4x
  • Bluetooth® version 4.1 low energy technology
  • In-camera RAW processing
  • New Advanced Filters: “Fog Remove” and “HDR Art”
  • Wi-Fi® image transfer and remote camera operation
  • Improved battery life for still images - approx. 450 frames
  • Improved start-up period:
    • 0.4 sec., when High Performance mode set to ON
    • 0.8 sec., when High Performance mode set to OFF
  • Photos can be sent to instax SHARE printers using the free instax SHARE App (iOS and Android)
  • Accessories include:
    • Li-ion battery NP-W126S
    • AC power adapter
    • Plug adapter
    • USB cable
    • Shoulder strap
    • Body cap
    • Owner's manual

Availability and Pricing

The new FUJIFILM X-A5 Camera Kit will be available on February 8, 2018 in the U.S. and Canada for USD $599.95 and CAD $749.99.

The new standalone XC15-45mmF3.5- 5.6 OIS PZ Lens will be available on March 15, 2018 in the U.S. and Canada for USD $299.95 and CAD $379.99.

Fujifilm XC 15-45mm F3.5-5.6 OIS PZ lens Principal specificationsLens typeZoom lensMax Format sizeAPS-C / DXFocal length15–45 mmImage stabilizationYesCIPA Image stabilization rating3 stop(s)Lens mountFujifilm XApertureMaximum apertureF3.5–5.6Minimum apertureF22Aperture ringNoNumber of diaphragm blades7OpticsElements10Groups9Special elements / coatings3 aspherical + 2 ED elementsFocusMinimum focus0.13 m (5.12″)Maximum magnification0.24×AutofocusYesMotor typeStepper motorFull time manualNoFocus methodInternalDistance scaleNoDoF scaleNoFocus distance limiterNoPhysicalWeight136 g (0.30 lb)Diameter63 mm (2.48″)Length44 mm (1.73″)SealingNoColourBlack, silverZoom methodRotary (extending)Power zoomYesZoom lockNoFilter thread52 mmHood suppliedNoTripod collarNo
Categories: Photo News

Full-frame showdown: Nikon D850 vs Canon 5D IV vs Sony a7R III

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 13:10

Dan and Sally Watson over at Learning Cameras recently put together a really useful comparison video that pits the Sony, Canon, and Nikon fanboys against each other in a series of real-world tests. Shooting with the Sony a7R III, Canon 5D Mark IV, and Nikon D850, Dan and Sally ran the cameras through a variety of tests that cover everything from skin tones, to low light, to dynamic range, to autofocus tracking and more.

We'll let you dive into the full 20-minute video if you want to see all of the comparisons for yourself, but one that we found particularly interesting—maybe because it confirmed our own tests—was the autofocus tracking comparison.

The Sony and Canon were shot in Auto AF area mode—Sony at 8 fps with live view, Canon and Nikon at 7 fps—and Dan and Sally found pretty much what we did. At 8 fps live view, the a7R III sometimes just goes out-of-focus then snaps back, Canon's iTR can be very jumpy, and Nikon's 3D tracking is more or less perfect. For what it's worth (since Dan and Sally didn't test this) in our tests, the Sony performed more consistently at 10fps without live view.

For the full breakdown, check out the video for yourself above—it gets the DPReview stamp of approval for being both entertaining and informative. And if you want to see more from Learning Cameras, you can follow the channel on YouTube, or catch Dan on Facebook and Instagram.

Categories: Photo News

Reuters photographers banned from Olympic opening ceremony over leaked photos

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 10:55

Reuters is in hot water with the IOC and PyeongChang Winter Olympics organizing committee after the news agency broadcast several images of the olympic cauldron being lit during an opening ceremony rehearsal this past weekend. The lapse—highly uncharacteristic for a major news agency with decades of experience respecting image embargoes—has gotten Reuters banned from covering the Opening Ceremony.

The news broke through the Yonhap News Agency, who is reporting that Reuters pulled the photos after the IOC and PyeongChang organizers complained.

However, as the damage had already been done, the IOC has decided to punish Reuters all the same, revoking the agency's media accreditation for the Opening Ceremony on Friday, February 9th. Furthermore, the Reuters photographer who took the leaked photos has been banned from covering the games altogether.

The PyeongChang organizing committee wants to make it clear that violating Olympic media embargoes is being taken very seriously, telling Yonhap that it will "enforce strong penalties on media companies and their reporters who disobey embargoes of the opening and closing ceremonies."

Categories: Photo News

Verizon follows AT&T, drops Huawei smartphones

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 09:58

A couple of weeks ago, AT&T decided not to carry any handsets from Chinese smartphone maker after pressure from lawmakers over security concerns. Now, according to sources at Bloomberg, Verizon is following AT&T's lead by dropping Huawei from its catalog.

Just like AT&T, the government is reportedly urging the move to end any collaboration with Huawei on standards for a 5G network in the US. "The next wave of wireless communication has enormous economic and national security implications," said Michael Wessel of a US-China security review commission. "China's participation in setting the standards and selling the equipment raises many national security issues that demand strict and prompt attention."

It appears the government's security concerns over Chinese spying through telecommunications infrastructure will likely delay the implementation of 5G technology in the US. Both AT&T and Verizon plan to roll out 5G networks this year, but now won't be able to offer Huawei devices, which will likely be the first smartphones to support the new standard.

Categories: Photo News

A strange shootout: $5,000 Zeiss Otus 28mm F1.4 vs $4,250 Leica Q

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 09:14

PhotoShelter founder and CEO Allen Murabayashi recently decided to pit two unlikely competitors against each other. In a short, unscientific comparison review, Murabayashi wanted to see how the $5,000 Zeiss Otus 28mm F1.4 lens stacked up against the almost-as-expensive $4,250 Leica Q, which sports a fixed 28mm F1.7 lens.

When you consider the identical focal lengths and "must have deep pockets" price tags, the shootout almost makes sense—so Allen slapped the Otus on a Nikon D850 and went out shooting with both cameras. And despite the fact that Allen admits "it’s impossible to make a straight apples to apples comparison" when it comes to image quality—given the D850's 45MP resolution compared to the 24MP Leica Q—he was still able to draw a pithy conclusion about who the Otus is made for, and why you might choose the Leica Q instead:

You can certainly make the argument that a 45MP sensor needs great glass, and in this regard, the Otus delivers the goods. But the slow operation of the lens turns a pretty great digital camera into something more like a large format camera.

If you like “slow” photography and have deep pockets, the Otus might be for you. If you just have deep pockets (and a bad back), stick with the Leica.

For a bit more depth, or if you want to check out some side-by-side comparison shots from PhotoShelter's testing, watch the video above or check out the full written comparison on the PhotoShelter Blog.

Categories: Photo News

Apple iPhone X review

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 07:13

DPReview smartphone reviews are written with the needs of photographers in mind. We focus on camera features, performance, and image quality.

The iPhone X is the newest flagship phone from Apple. It comes with twin optically stabilized 12MP rear cameras, a 7MP front-facing camera with 'TrueDepth' technology, artificial background blur and specialized lighting effects, DNG Raw file capture, and of course is otherwise a highly capable and extremely speedy mobile device.

And it should be, given the asking price: at an MSRP of $999, the iPhone X (pronounced iPhone Ten, which I'll admit I'm still getting used to) is priced comfortably higher than many of its current competitors that also come with an emphasis on photographic prowess.

Out-of-camera JPEG in HDR mode.
ISO 20 | 1/229 sec | F1.8
Photo by Carey Rose

As with just about every modern high-end smartphone, the results of the picture-taking process on the iPhone are as much about clever software tricks as they are about the hardware. With the software and hardware combined, does the iPhone X truly offer image quality comparable to so-called 'real cameras?' Is artificial background blur driving the final nails into the interchangeable-lens camera coffin?

Of course, the answer isn't all that simple, and depends an awful lot on the preferences of the user behind the lens. But let's dive in and take a look at what Apple's latest smartphone shooter is capable of.

Key Photographic / Video Specifications
  • Dual 12MP sensors
  • 28/56mm equivalent focal lengths
  • F1.8/2.4 aperture
  • On-sensor phase detection
  • Quad-LED flash
  • DNG Raw capture and manual control with 3rd party apps
  • 4K video at 60 fps
  • 1080p 120/240fps slow-motion video
  • 7MP front-facing 'TrueDepth' camera with F2.2 aperture
Other Specifications
  • 5.8-inch, 2436x1125 OLED
  • Apple A11 Fusion chipset
  • 3GB RAM
  • 64/256GB storage
  • 2,716mAh battery
  • Wireless charging (Qi compatible)
Categories: Photo News

*Updated* Adobe is preparing a major Lightroom Classic performance update, and we got to try it

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 06:46

This article has been updated to include results from a 2015 quad-core Apple MacBook Pro.

Adobe Lightroom Classic users have been pining for a serious performance update for ages—even Adobe admitted that Lightroom performance was lackluster, and improving it was 'top priority.' Well, it looks like 'top priority' is going to pay off very soon.

Late last week, Adobe told DPReview that it has a significant Lightroom Classic performance update in the works. The update—which is "coming soon"—is supposed to improve performance across the board for anybody using a multi-core machine with at least 12GB of RAM. Or, in Adobe's own words:

In this upcoming Lightroom Classic 7.2 release, we were able to make significant strides with our partners at Intel on addressing key performance issues. We have optimized CPU and memory usage so that performance will scale better across multiple cores on computers with at least 12 GB of RAM.

Adobe claims the update will result in:

  • Faster import and preview generation
  • Faster walking of images in the Loupe View
  • Faster rendering of adjustments in Develop
  • Faster batch merge operations of HDR/Panos
  • Faster export

The company's own benchmarks back up this claim in a big way. Adobe shared these results with DPReview, revealing substantially improved export times between the current v7.1 and the upcoming v7.2.

Adobe Export Test

Adobe tested the new build on three machines:

  1. A 10-core iMac Pro with 32GB of 2666MHz DDR4 RAM, a 3GHz Intel Xeon W processor, AMD Radeon Pro Vega 64 graphics card with 16GB of RAM.
  2. An 8-core Windows 10 PC with 64GB of 2400MHz DDR4 RAM, a 3.2GHz Intel Xeon E5-1660 processor, and an Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 graphics card with 8GB of RAM.
  3. A 10-core Windows 10 PC with 64GB of 2400MHz DDR4 RAM, a 2.9GHz Intel Core i9 7960X processor, and an Nvidia Quodro P2000 graphics card

Each of the three showed significant speed improvements when exporting 100 heavily edited Raw files as either full-resolution JPEGs or full-resolution DNGs:

  • The 10-core iMac Pro exported JPEGs 29.5% faster and DNGs 43.7% faster
  • The 8-core Windows 10 PC exported JPEGs 32.5% faster and DNGs 32.4% faster
  • The 10-core Windows 10 PC exported JPEGs 48.3% faster and DNGs 64.7% faster

Additionally, while subsequent tests of the current version got slower and slower on the Windows, version 7.2 fixes this problem. In other words: Lightroom Classic will no longer slow down over the course of a long editing session on Windows machines.

Our own tests also showed a noticeable speed boost when it came to exporting files, and a massive increase in performance on import. Adobe gave us early access to the new build, and we tested it alongside the current version of Lightroom Classic CC twice. We ran an initial export test on a 2016 13-inch MacBook Pro, with 16GB Ram and a 3.3GHz dual-core i7 processor running macOS 10.12.6, and found a modest but still significant speed improvement of around 11%.

After speaking to Adobe's technical experts, we then conducted a follow-up import and export test on a Mid-2015 15-inch MacBook Pro. Specifically, a Retina model with a 2.2GHz quad-core Intel Core i7, 16GB of RAM, and Intel Iris 5200 Pro graphics card. It's not exactly in the same class as the 8+ core powerhouses that Adobe seems to have lying around, but it's arguably closer to the average setup for an enthusiast or semi-professional photographer. Also, despite being an older machine, we knew that according to Adobe, more cores would give us a better chance of seeing some serious performance gains.

As such, these results replace our earlier published figures.

DPReview Import Test (2015 Quad-core MacBook Pro)

When importing 130 Raw files from the Fujifilm X-T2 (7.6GB in total) and building "Standard" previews, we saw a major performance boost in LR Classic CC 7.2 on our quad-core 2015 MacBook Pro. Roughly 80%, in fact.

  • LR 7.1 - 4:05 (245 seconds)
  • LR 7.2 - 50 seconds
DPReview Export Test (2015 Quad-core MacBook Pro)

When exporting the same 130 Raw files as JPEGs (quality level 80, Adobe RGB), after heavy edits (including exposure, shadow/highlight adjustment, lens corrections and luminance noise reduction) we saw a modest performance improvement in LR Classic CC 7.2 compared to 7.1. Roughly 10% when averaged out - very similar to the 11% performance increase we saw when we ran the earlier test on our dual-core 2013 Mac.

  • LR 7.1 - 11:08 (668 seconds)
  • LR 7.2 - 10:16 (616 seconds)

Adobe was adamant that this update is just the beginning. The company is "pleased with these performance improvements" and believes Lightroom Classic users will be please as well, but Adobe also told us it is "far from done." The company promises continued performance optimizations and improvements in future releases of Lightroom Classic CC.

For now, we're just happy to see the first fruits of that "top priority" promise Adobe made last year.

Categories: Photo News

HP EliteBook x360 1020 G2 review - CNET

CNET Reviews - Tue, 01/30/2018 - 05:00
The built-in privacy filter in the HP EliteBook x360 1020 G2 wards off prying eyes in this slim, powerful hybrid.
Categories: Photo News

Canon patents fingerprint reader for cameras and lenses

DP Review Latest news - Mon, 01/29/2018 - 15:34

The ability to unlock your smartphone or computer using just your fingerprint has been an option for ages, but it looks like digital cameras might not be too far behind. A recent Canon patent shows how the Japanese camera giant could implement a fingerprint ID sensor into both its camera bodies and lenses to safeguard your images and make cameras less tempting for thieves.

The patent (US Patent Application 20180012061) was first spotted by Northlight Images, goes beyond a security lockout though. The fingerprint sensor could be customized like any Custom Function button—allowing you to use different fingers to control autofocus, image stabilization, and more by simply scanning your finger while you shoot.

You can have as many custom buttons as you have conveniently placed fingers.

On the security side, the fingerprint reader could be used to completely lock out your gear, or even customize the camera for multiple 'registered' users. So whether it's you, your spouse, or one of your artistically inclined children picking up the DSLR, it would immediately default to their custom settings once scanned in.

The idea, so standard or even outdated on smartphones, seems positively futuristic when you apply it to cameras. Here's hoping this is one patent that does eventually see the light of day in real Canon products.

Categories: Photo News

Capsulier Revo Release Date, Price and Specs - CNET

CNET Reviews - Mon, 01/29/2018 - 13:30
The Capsulier Revo automatically makes Nespresso coffee pods with your own beans.
Categories: Photo News

Tourists are destroying New Zealand's iconic Lake Wanaka tree for Instagram photos

DP Review Latest news - Mon, 01/29/2018 - 12:38

The solitary tree found in New Zealand's Lake Wanaka—an iconic landscape photography subject—is at risk of destruction if tourists, particularly Instagrammers, don't start showing it more respect. The Lake Wanaka Tree is a crack willow—its very name refers to the tree's brittle nature—and its social media popularity has fueled an influx of tourists who are destroying the tree as they attempt to capture Instagram-worthy shots.

There's even an Instagram hashtag dedicated to the tree: #ThatWanakaTree.

Climbing this tree will soon be banned! Take care and protect it for future photographers. No harm was done to this tree to make this shot. ##ThatWanakaTree #samyanglensglobal #milkyway #stars #epic #selfie #wanaka #lakewanaka #nzmustdo #protectthetree

A post shared by Mikey Mack (@mack_photography_nz) on Jan 18, 2018 at 3:46am PST

The tree lost a limb around Christmas time last year, spurring officials to take proactive measures in protecting the tree. According to Lonely Planet, which spoke with Queenstown Lakes District Council arboricultural officer Tim Errington, officials will now place warning signs near the tree alerting visitors about the dangers of climbing on it.

The warning signs will be written in both English and Chinese, though more drastic measures may be taken if tourists ignore them. Errington explained that officials haven't put a fence around the tree thus far because it would "take away some of the beauty associated with its stunning background," but the idea is being considered.

Categories: Photo News

Google’s long-awaited Clips Camera hits stores, will cost you $250

DP Review Latest news - Mon, 01/29/2018 - 12:13

If you’ve been desperately waiting for Google’s artificial intelligence-driven Clips camera to go on sale now is your moment. The company has added the video clip shooting device to its store for US customers at the expected $250 price tag, with delivery expected between the end of February and the beginning of March.

The lifelogging camera was first revealed at the Pixel 2 event in October. It's designed to recognize the best moments and composition, and to shoot automatically when it ‘thinks’ the occasion is right. The aptly named Clips camera shoots short 'clips' of video which can be reviewed in a Google Clips app. In the app, clips can be saved or deleted, and still images can be extracted from the clips as well.

The 12MP camera has a shutter button too for human driven activation, but the main idea is that it is placed somewhere it can see what’s going on, and it does all the work for you. The main idea is that using Clips in its automatic ‘intelligent’ mode allows the user to be in the pictures instead of having to be behind the camera.

Below is a sample clip posted to the Google blog, with the video captured by the camera on the left and the still extracted from the video on the right. Stills are extracted using the Google Clips app.

The camera can record at 15fps, and uses a lens with a 130° angle of view. Images are stored in the 16GB internal memory, and the camera can run for three hours on a single charge. Connection is via USB-C, Wi-Fi or Bluetooth.

As reported before, professional photographers were consulted to help the company understand what makes a good or a bad picture, so the after analyzing what’s happening and where the elements are in the frame, the device’s brain decides whether to record or not. The camera also learns about the people you mix with, and will take more clips of people it sees often, as it will assume they are closer to you. Thankfully, it will also get to know your cat, to save you the bother of photographing it yourself.

For more information, visit the Google webstore.

Categories: Photo News

Hive View Camera review - CNET

CNET Reviews - Mon, 01/29/2018 - 11:15
Hive is known for pack-based smart home products, but the company took a different approach with this stylish $200 smart camera.
Categories: Photo News

Suvie Kitchen Robot Release Date, Price and Specs - CNET

CNET Reviews - Mon, 01/29/2018 - 10:27
This kitchen gadget uses water to cool and cook meals that you assemble or order online.
Categories: Photo News

Lomography celebrates 25th anniversary with three limited edition cameras

DP Review Latest news - Mon, 01/29/2018 - 10:11

To celebrate its 25th anniversary, Lomography has launched limited edition versions of three popular Lomo cameras, including the one model that started it all: The Lomo LC-A+.

In addition to Lomography's original 35mm with zone-focus and auto exposure, limited versions of the LC-A 120 medium format camera and the LC-Wide 35mm camera with 17mm wide-angle lens are also available. All three cameras are clad in brown leather and come with Lomography's motto embossed on the rear:

No Rules, Happy Mistakes, Analogue Love

For the LC-A+ and LC-Wide there is also a matching brown leather camera case as part of this limited edition.

All items can be ordered now in the Lomography shop, with shipping for the US and Canada planned for January 29th. The LC-A+ is $300, the LC-Wide will set you back $440, and the medium format LC-120 requires an investment of $480. The limited edition case by itself is available for $80.

To learn more, visit the Lomography website or go straight to the Lomography shop.

Categories: Photo News

Ubtech Robotics Lynx review - CNET

CNET Reviews - Mon, 01/29/2018 - 05:00
Ubtech's Alexa-enabled bot has a lot of tricks up its sleeve, but none of them hold up to scrutiny.
Categories: Photo News

Michael Christopher Brown on war, trauma and bearing witness

DP Review Latest news - Mon, 01/29/2018 - 04:00
Photographer Michael Christopher Brown's work has taken him all over the world, from conflict zones in the middle east to post-Castro Cuba. Often shooting with just a smartphone, Brown's work is characterized by an intimacy and immediacy that in some cases, makes it difficult viewing.

Getting close to the action has its risks, as he found out in 2011 in Libya, where he was seriously injured in an attack that killed fellow photographers Tim Hetherington and Chris Hondros.

Michael's 'Native America' project focuses on the people and cultures of native American reservations across the USA

In the years since he returned from Libya, Michael has traveled all over the globe, but his latest commission brought him all the way back home. Starting in his home state of Washington, Michael's 'Native America' project focuses on the people and cultures of native American reservations across the USA.

Funded by a grant from Sony in 2017, the project has taken him to 16 reservations in seven states. Despite the challenges faced by the native populations inside the reservations, Brown describes the project - which was shot using the Sony a9 - as a 'celebration of life'.

We sat down with Michael recently to talk to him about his career up to and including the 'Native America' project.

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Gallery and impressions: The Tamron 100-400mm F4.5-6.3 is light, sharp and stabilized

DP Review Latest news - Sun, 01/28/2018 - 06:00
Shot on the Canon EOS 80D.
ISO 800 | 154mm | 1/200 sec | F5.6

The Tamron 100-400mm F4.5-6.3 Di VC USD is a well-priced ($800) telephoto lens with a useful zoom range. Available in both Canon EF and Nikon F mount, this lens is useful on both full-frame and crop bodies, offering a 150-600mm equiv. field of view on the latter. We first saw it at PPE 2017 and were impressed by its reasonable size and weight given its reach – at 1.11 kg / 2.45 lb - it is the lightest lens in its class.

See our Tamron 100-400mm F4.5-6.3 sample gallery Optically, the 100-400mm is constructed of 17 elements arranged in 11 groups, including low-dispersion elements to correct for aberrations. It also features multiple coatings to reduce ghosting and flare, as well as a protective fluorine coating on the front element. Image stabilization is crucial when it comes to long zoom lenses and Tamron's optical Vibration Correction system offers the equivalent of 4 stops of correction (CIPA rated).

Shown with the optional tripod collar attached, sold separately for $130. Key Specifications:
  • 100-400mm zoom range
  • 150-600mm equiv. field of view on APS-C
  • F4.5-6.3 maximum aperture
  • VC Image stablization
  • Dust and moisture resistant
  • Silent AF
  • Florine coating on front element
  • Minimum focus distance: 1.5m
  • Maximum magnification ratio: 1:3.6
  • Filter thread: 67mm
  • Available in Canon EF and Nikon F mount

Wildlife and outdoor sports shooters can take solace in the fact that this lens is moisture resistant, with eight rubber gaskets, including one at the base of the lens mount. It's compatible with Tamron's TAP-in Console, allowing users to update firmware and/or fine-tune AF. It can also be used with the company's 1.4X and 2X teleconverters. An A035TM accessory tripod collar is sold separately for $130.

Shot on the Canon EOS 5DS R.
ISO 200 | 100mm | 1/1600 sec | F4.5 Design and Handling

According to Tamron the lightweight design of this lens is mostly due to its magnesium alloy internal construction, though it is worth noting the outer shell of the lens is plastic (the lens mount is metal). The lens telescopes when zoomed, increasing in length about 50%. At its most compact it is about 20 cm / 7.8 in long.

Well-constructed, solid feeling and well-balanced, nothing rattles around inside the lens when shaken (my favorite test). Zooming from 100mm to 400mm requires a one quarter turn of the large rubberized zoom ring (located at the front of the lens).

Zooming from 100mm to 400mm requires a one quarter turn of the large rubberized zoom ring

'Lens creep' is an annoying fact of life when using telescoping lenses, fortunately it was not an issue during field testing. Just in case, there is a lock on the lens barrel (which can only be used when the zoom is retracted in to 100mm).

Toward the base of the lens barrel you'll find an AF/MF switch as well as as a controller for selecting one's VC (vibration compensation) mode: Mode 1 is for normal stabilization, Mode 2 is for use when panning. Users can also turn off VC completely, which useful if you're on a tripod. Just below the focus ring is the focus distance scale window.

Performance Hand-held at 400mm, shot using a 1/125 sec shutter because I live in Seattle and it is always dark outside. Shot on the Canon EOS 80D
ISO 800 | 400mm | 1/125 sec | F6.3

Tamron is pitching this lens as appropriate for sports and wildlife shooters, two groups that require reliable AF and effective stabilization. Fortunately, our real world usage shows the 100-400mm excelling in both areas.

The image stabilization system proved effective at helping to eliminate camera shake at shutter speeds I'd ordinarily not feel comfortable using, given the focal length used. The moment you engage AF the IS system kicks in – with one's eye to the finder the effectiveness of the compensation is immediately apparent.

Autofocus is both silent (hello ultrasonic drive) and fast (powered by two processors). Acquisition is nearly instant in AF-S and it's equally fast and impressive in AF-C. Users can expect it to maintain focus on the moving subjects they point it at, assuming their camera body is up to the challenge.

Image Quality The lens is sharp through the zoom range, out of focus areas are also inoffensive. Shot on the Canon EOS 5DS R.
ISO 400 | 400mm | 1/500 sec | F6.3

Though this lens has a slow maximum aperture and is best used for daylight shooting, all signs point to it being optically very good. Our copy of the 100-400mm was well-centered and universally sharp across the frame at all focal lengths we shot. Ghosting and flare are rare.

[It is] universally sharp across the frame at all focal lengths we shot

Chromatic aberration is also really well controlled, though it does appears in some images. Lateral CA is well controlled in this lens, and when it's there it's easy to correct in Adobe Camera Raw and other Raw processing programs. However axial CA, which you can see as green fringing in this shot, is more difficult to correct for but generally isn't very severe with this lens. We also noted some vignetting when used on full-frame, but that is also fairly easy to correct in post.

Bokeh is about what we would expect for a complex telephoto lens. Ironically, it looks nice and smooth toward the shorter end, but as you get to the long end out-of-focus highlights show odd patterns. We expect this has to do with how smooth the glass surfaces can be polished for a lens at this price point.

Conclusion For travel photographers looking for a casual, lightweight telephoto lens to explore with, the Tamron 100-400 F4.5-6.3 is a solid choice. Shot on the EOS 5DS R.
ISO 400 | 143mm | 1/1250 sec | F5

The Tamron 100-400mm F4.5-6.3 is a great telephoto lens for daylight photography, whether your subjects are moving or not. It offers fast, silent autofocus, good stabilization and is optically impressive at all focal lengths. All that comes in a weather-resistant package that also happens to be the lightest in its class.

We feel comfortable giving it our recommendation

Priced the same as the Sigma 100-400mm F5-6.3 DG OS HSM, the most obvious difference between the two is the Tamron is faster on the wide end, F4.5 vs F5 (and it's also a hair lighter). That aside, the two offer very similar features like image stabilization, multi layer coatings and special elements for dealing with CA. We'll have to revisit the Sigma to see just how well the two compare. But having spent a good amount of time with the Tamron, we feel comfortable giving it our recommendation.

What we like:
  • Sharp, versatile zoom range on both APS-C and full-frame
  • Lightest lens in its class
  • Moisture and dust resistant
  • Impressive image stablization
  • Silent AF is fast and accurate
What we don’t:
  • Slow aperture range
  • Pricey tripod collar sold separately
  • Vignettes on full-frame (though easy to correct)
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Categories: Photo News

Sunset, golf and a false nuclear missile alert: Four days shooting in Hawaii

DP Review Latest news - Sat, 01/27/2018 - 06:00
Sony a6500 | 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS @ 95mm | ISO 100 | F6.3

Being a child of the Midwest a hike, in my mind, is more or less walking across land that is mostly flat. There are trees, usually a dirt path, and maybe the occasional hill. A hike in Hawaii, I came to learn recently, can mean something vastly different.

I was in Hawaii on a Sony-sponsored trip along with a handful of other photography journalists, on Oahu for two vastly different shooting experiences: shooting pro golf with the a9, and trying out a new 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 zoom for the a6000-series. I was armed with a TSA-approved 3.4 ounces of sunscreen, a handful of memory cards and a pair of running shoes that prove to be woefully outmatched by the "hike" we're about to embark on.

My first clue should have been when one member of our party put some spiky, chainmail-type overshoes on top of her street shoes. We walked across a parking lot toward the "trailhead," a rocky slope where a faint suggestion of a path disappeared into some trees. What followed was 30 minutes of scrambling up a steep incline, grabbing at roots, tree branches and rocks for support. Oh, and did I mention I have a slightly weird thing about heights?

Suddenly, I was quite grateful for the a6500 and the lens' small size. The whole kit fit easily into a low profile backpack and didn't provide an extra physical challenge to overcome. Along the way we found a couple of points to stop off, breathe, and take a few photos. Every time we stopped I considered chickening out on the rest of the climb. Nobody would judge me, and I'd get perfectly nice photos from halfway up.

Sony a6500 | 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS @ 18mm | ISO 100 | F4.5

Maybe the morning's events made me feel bolder (more on that later). Maybe being the only lady journalist on the trip made me hungrier to prove my grit. Maybe it was just the beer I had at lunch giving me some extra courage. I kept going whatever the reason, and I'm pretty darn glad that I did.

Insert your favorite inspirational quote / rap lyric about making it to the top here.

Sony a6500 | 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS @ 18mm | ISO 200 | F5.6

I wouldn't have wanted to carry a lens/camera combo much bigger than the a6500 and 18-135mm on that hike. For its size, it proved to be a pretty versatile kit. The lens was wide enough for a sweeping view of sunset in the valley, but long enough for a quick shot of a helicopter in the distance when it swooped by unexpectedly. Your standard kit zoom wouldn't have provided quite as many options.

Did you instinctively start humming the Jurassic Park theme when you saw this image? No? You're a liar.

Sony a6500 | 18-135mm F3.5-5.6 OSS @ 90mm | ISO 100 | F5.6

I tend to gravitate toward wide lenses and like the convenience of carrying lightweight primes, but I was very happy to have the variety that the telezoom offered. When you're standing on one 3' x 3' rock scared to move left or right for fear of falling to your death, you don't have too many composition options with a 24mm prime.

As it turns out, that hike wasn't the only time I contemplated my own mortality that day. Let me tell you about the events of that morning.

We all know now what happened, but when you're woken up by your phone buzzing with this message (special attention to the part that says THIS IS NOT A DRILL) it makes for a very strange start to the day. The short version of my story is that I spent about 15 minutes in a semi-panic, and having only the tornado drills of my youth to call on for guidance, huddled in my hotel bathroom with a single bottle of water. Not exactly your best shot at surviving a nuclear attack.

I wish I could say I had some kind of profound experience when I found out it was all a mistake. In reality, I just put on some shoes and went downstairs for coffee and a yogurt, and more or less just went about my day. I made time to get into the ocean. That was nice.

A couple of days before the threat of nuclear warfare appeared on my phone, I found myself in a very different state of mind as I tried to photograph professional golf.

Sony a9 | FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS @ 121mm | ISO 100 | F5.6

Golf is a mysterious game. As opposed to the tennis tournaments and baseball games I'm familiar with, the action happens all around you. I've thought of it as a game with a leisurely pace, but trying to photograph it for the first time, I'm amazed at how quickly the action unfolds. You have to get into position, pray that a caddy doesn't step into your way at the last moment, and you only have a few seconds to get your shot before it's all over. Oh, and you have to keep in mind the direction of the sun, ugly things like trash cans creeping into your backgrounds, and woe betide you if you make even a peep as a golfer prepares to swing a club – you'll be swiftly escorted off the grounds.

"Game changer" has become sort of a joke around the office since it's a phrase that's been used to death and rarely lives up to its meaning. But if you're a golf photographer, you really could consider the a9 to be a game changer. Plenty of resolution, 20 fps and silent shutter – particularly that last bit – is huge for a sport where silence isn't just golden, it's mandatory. Jeannette Moses noted this revelation when she photographed the Presidents Cup last year with the a9. I've seen it firsthand too, and it really is strange to be so close to a professional golfer raising his club to strike the ball while firing away at 20 fps.

Sony a9 | FE 100-400mm F4.5-5.6 GM OSS @ 100mm | ISO 100 | F5.6

Sony's making a clear appeal to pro sports photographers with the a9, and before we set foot on the golf course we got a primer on the company's efforts to bolster its offerings with Pro Support. If you aren't familiar, this is a program for working photographers that aims to put Sony on even footing with Canon and Nikon.

Sony Pro Support members pay a $100 annual fee that entitles them to 24/7 phone and email support and access to service centers in Los Angeles and New York. If you need to send a product in for a fix, Sony claims a three-day turnaround with free loaner gear to cover repairs that take longer. To qualify, photographers must own at least two full-frame Sony bodies, three lenses and must be actively earning income from their photography.

For comparison, Nikon uses a point system and requires at least two camera bodies and two lenses. The system is tiered, but all levels include priority repairs, repair loans and discounts on repairs. Canon also uses a point-based tiered system, but doesn't require a certain number of lenses or bodies.

I'm by no means a pro, and shooting golf proves to be a much more challenging experience than I was anticipating. An afternoon carrying two camera bodies, one of them with a sizable 100-400mm lens attached, was a fairly taxing endeavor. I also put my finger on the shutter too gingerly a few times, and with 20 fps silent shutter it's easy to end up with hundreds of photos you didn't mean to take. From over 3000 (!) images, I managed to scrape together a handful I feel comfortable putting my name next to. Not exactly a stellar hit rate.

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I have a renewed appreciation for the tough job pro sports photographers have, and a respect for Hawaii's lovely-yet-dizzying hiking trails. I also jump out of my seat now when my phone buzzes too loudly and I'm finally getting serious about putting together an earthquake preparedness kit. But my feeling of having stretched myself as a photographer, and I suppose as a hiker, outweighs my sense of distress over the whole thing. And if you're going to survive a fake nuclear missile attack, there are worse places to experience it than Hawaii.

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