Cardinal

Field test of the Tamron 24-70mm f/2.8 Lens: A pro lens at a prosumer price

Unless you make a lot of money with your mid-range zoom lens, or are willing to spend what it takes to get the best, $1900 for the 2 pound is a hard price to justify. For that price, you get an ultra-sharp, ultra-fast, lens, but you don’t even get VR. I’ve enjoyed using Sigma’s version, the . It is much less expensive, but not as solidly built and also isn’t stabilized. Until now there hasn’t been a value-priced version of a 24-70 f/2.8 that could measure up to the Nikon. That’s why I was excited to work with the new , which not only featured a fast focus motor but unique among mid-range pro zooms, also has image stabilization….

 

Nikon DSLRs over the years: From the Nikon D1 to the Nikon D4

I was fortunate enough to be able to shoot with a on my recent Alaska photo safaris. It was a blast, and allowed me to get some great images that I probably wouldn’t have gotten with previous DSLRs – especially those requiring High ISO shooting. It gave me the chance to reflect back on the last 12 years of my photography of bears in Alaska, starting with film and progressing through the D1 and nearly every other Nikon DSLR since. I put my thoughts together in an .

Join us for a B&H Photo Walk through the Bronx Zoo in June

I’m really happy to say that I’ll be leading a photo walk for B&H through the Bronx Zoo in New York on Thursday, June 7th. The event is free, but you do need to pay for your Zoo admission. For those of you in or around the New York area its about the easiest way to get some practice in on your wildlife photography. Open to photographers of all ages and all amounts of gear! You can . Lorrie and I hope to see you there!

Inexpensive Canvas print option -- Easy Canvas

Canvases on display from a show I did on The American WestRegular readers will know that I love getting canvases printed by . They do a great job, and provide awesome customer service. However, they're not cheap, so I periodically get asked about a less expensive alternative for when ultimate quality isn't needed. I've finally found one, , who is running a large , with discounts and 2 for 1 pricing. I did a test print and din't get the same tonal range as with COD, but their prices are meaningfully lower and the quality is certainly very acceptable. [NOTE: I don't have any financial relationship with either company]. For the curious, I don't print canvases much myself because...

Alaska Brown (aka "Grizzly") Bear & Puffin Photo Safari 2018 (2 sessions)

Date: 
Monday, July 9, 2018 - 18:00

Session 1 & 2 2018

Taking deposits for 2018

If you'd like to join us in 2018, you can get a jump on things by .
Our dates are the same (July 9-15 and 14-21) and we will honor the 2017 price if you .

2017 was as another great year for Bears & Puffins, we're looking forward to 2018!

It seems like just yesterday, but 2018 will be my 19th year returning to the Cook Inlet in Alaska to photograph America's most spectacular animals.  

Spending a week [6 nights, giving us 5 full and two partial shooting days for the second session, (or 5 nights for the first session) -- longer than other trips to the area] with Alaskan Coastal Brown Bears, often called Grizzlies, is truly a life-changing experience. Unlike the bears at Brooks Lodge in Katmai, which are stressed out and offer very limited viewing, we'll be able to see bears in their native and un-stressed environment.

One day the bears will be grazing on the nutrient rich grass and the next they'll be up to their shoulder digging in the mud for clams. Without question these are my favorite weeks of the year.

Ultimate Photo Accessories, including headlamps, aka “dork lights”

Okay, they’re not really called “dork lights.” They’re headlamps, but it’s hard to deny that they make you look a bit like a dork. However, they’re invaluable, so for my contribution to Chris Gampat’s piece on the B&H blog on the most interesting and useful accessory in my camera bag, the choice was a no brainer. You can , including some other great recommendations, and when you’re convinced you can buy yourself the cat’s meow of photographers’ headlamps, the – it features a retractable cord, multiple brightness levels, and both white and red LEDs for regular and night vision use.

Nikon D800 sensor blows away the competition in DxOMark tests

The set the all time record score of 95 on its DxOMark tests, eclipsing the previous "king for 3 days," the . In short, purchasers of either camera are likely to be delighted with the images they get. Of course there is more to a camera than just the image quality, but if you'd like to read up on all the scores of the D800 and the D4 you can head over to the  You can from B&H, or the .

Deciding between the Nikon D800 and Nikon D800e? Here's some help...

Think birds aren’t as important as people? Think again…

When a war correspondent fudges an image there is no question that it is a problem for them, and for their news organization. And when a nature photographer fibs about a contest image, as happened with the “Wildlife photographer of the year” that’s a known bad thing. So too when photos in National Geographic or other nature magazines have been fudged to distort reality. This week though, truth in bird photos has reached a new zenith…

Details emerge on Nikon D800, Nikon 55-300mm now $247

Details continue to emerge about the expected Nikon D800. Reportedly a couple shooters have early versions and are confirming that the camera will indeed feature a 36MP full-frame sensor, while being smaller than the D700. At first this seems a little looney, as such a high-resolution camera is unlikely to be able to match the low noise capability the D3/D3s/D700 pack of full-frame sensor cameras have come to be known for. But maybe Nikon is crazy like a fox…

Making Sense out of Sensor Sizes

--by David Cardinal

It has become almost impossible to actually figure out how big a sensor is, or how long a lens is, just by glancing at the specs. For most of the photography industry, for many decades, 35mm was more or less the norm. By definition that meant a standard size film negative, about 35mm by 24mm – corresponding to today’s “full frame” sensors – and a simple measurement of focal length for lenses could be read right of the lens as a result.

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