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D-Link EXO AC2600 MU-MIMO Wi-Fi router (DIR-882) review - CNET

CNET Reviews - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 10:15
The D-Link DIR-882 dual-band router can transmit data to multiple devices simultaneously, has robust customization and an affordable price.
Categories: Photo News

Facebook just doubled the resolution of photos in Facebook Messenger

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 09:24

Photo messaging has been around for a long time, but as smartphone cameras get better and better, this form of 'visual communication' is only becoming more common. That's why, earlier today, Facebook announced a major update to Facebook Messenger that doubles the resolution of the photos you send from 2K to 4K—or, more specifically, to a max of 4096 x 4096 pixels.

"We heard that people want to send and receive high resolution photos in Messenger," reads the release from Facebook, "and considering people send more than 17 billion photos through Messenger every month, we're making your conversations richer, sharper, and better than ever."

And just in case you're wondering: this resolution bump should not affect speed. According to Facebook, "your photos will also be sent just as quickly before, even at this new, higher resolution."

Here are a few before and after samples that show what doubling the resolution from the previous 2K looks like IRL.

*The images on the left were reproduced to reflect the previous default resolution at 2K. The images on the right reflect the new default resolution at 4K

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To take advantage of the new feature yourself, update your FB Messenger app to the latest version and every photo you send should automatically go out at up to 4096 x 4096 pixels.

For now, the feature is limited to iPhone and Android users in the US, Canada, France, Australia, the UK, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, and South Korea. Additional countries will be added 'in the coming weeks.'

Press Release

Making Visual Messaging Even Better - Introducing High Resolution Photos in Messenger

By Sean Kelly & Hagen Green, Product Managers, Messenger

The way people message today is no longer limited by just text; visual messaging as our new universal language is much more emotional and expressive. Whether you're catching up over moments big and small — like a recent vacation, an amazing meal at a new restaurant, a new member of the family, or the first snow day of the year — sharing photos of our experiences brings our conversations to life.

We're making significant investments in how people communicate visually on Messenger. That's why today, we're excited to share that people can send and receive photos in Messenger at 4K resolution — or up to 4,096 x 4,096 pixels per image — the highest quality many smartphones support. We heard that people want to send and receive high resolution photos in Messenger — and considering people send more than 17 billion photos through Messenger every month — we're making your conversations richer, sharper, and better than ever.

Your photos will also be sent just as quickly before, even at this new, higher resolution.

You may be curious how much of a difference 4K resolution makes. Take a look at the before and after examples in the gallery above. On the right at 4K resolution, once you zoom in, the photo is much sharper and clearer so you can see every detail. That's what we mean by bringing your conversations to life.

To send and share photos at 4K resolution, first update your Messenger app to make sure you have the latest version. Then open a conversation and tap the camera roll icon. Select the photo, tap send, and the person you're messaging with will receive the high resolution photo.

Starting today, we are rolling out 4K resolution on both iPhone and Android to people in the US, Canada, France, Australia, the UK, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, and South Korea. In the coming weeks, we're planning to roll out 4k resolution to additional countries.

We know that every message matters to you, no matter how or what you're sharing. We appreciate that you continue to use Messenger to connect with the people you care about most.

Categories: Photo News

Video: first look at the Leica CL

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 09:00

Meet the Leica CL, an interchangeable lens mirrorless camera with a 24 megapixel APS-C sensor. It uses Leica L mount and sits alongside the Leica TL2. The CL differs from the TL2 by offering an electronic viewfinder and a traditional control layout. Find out what else it's got going for it in our 90 second 'First look' video.

Categories: Photo News

Nintendo Switch review - CNET

CNET Reviews - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 08:59
It's been an impressive first year for the Switch as the clever hybrid console's ample game library lives up to its promise of being a home-and-away gaming machine.
Categories: Photo News

Buoy Labs Buoy Release Date, Price and Specs - CNET

CNET Reviews - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 08:00
The Buoy knows everything using water at home and if there's a problem.
Categories: Photo News

2019 Aston Martin Vantage Release Date, Price and Specs - Roadshow

CNET Reviews - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 07:55
Sharper performance, sharper looks... it's the whole package.
Categories: Photo News

2019 Lincoln MKC Release Date, Price and Specs - Roadshow

CNET Reviews - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 07:53
As far as mid-cycle refreshes go, this one is light.
Categories: Photo News

Analysis: The Sony a7R III is still a star eater

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 07:35

We sent some files to our friend Jim Kasson for analysis, and he confirms that the Sony a7R III is definitely still a Star Eater, despite several claims to the contrary that have been published online over the past week.

Looking at Kasson's graphs, one can clearly see the noise reduction kick in near Nyquist in Kasson's energy plots. Indeed, in our own shots of the stars with the a7R III and latest a7R II (firmware v3.00 and above), our final files only show stars that are larger than one pixel with a few neighboring pixels: suggesting that smaller stars are indeed 'eaten' or dimmed due to a spatial filtering algorithm.

At a 3.2-second exposure, the 'spacial filtering' (Star Eater) is very mild, and won't affect your stars. But as soon as you hit 4-seconds, spacial filtering kicks in big time, causing the same Star Eater problems that was seen in the a7R II

This is a missed opportunity for Sony, and something dedicated astrophotographers will want to consider when deciding between the a7R III and other options that don't have this same issue (a Nikon D850 for example). Other photographers happy with the number of stars still in their shots simply won't care.

We'll drop in one of our sample photos shortly for your pixel-peeping pleasure. But for now, we can say this with confidence: while a lot of stars still survive 'Star Eater', the a7R III continues the trend of noise reduction that dims or erases small stars at exposure longer than 3.2s.

Categories: Photo News

Leica CL review - CNET

CNET Reviews - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 06:00
Innovative controls and form-over-function omissions make the CL a great but frequently frustrating mirrorless camera to use at a high price.
Categories: Photo News

Leica CL brings built-in viewfinder, conventional control layout to L lineup

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 06:00
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Leica has just released the CL, the forth in its series of APS-C L-mount cameras. While it shares a name with a camera released in the mid-70s, the new CL is a thoroughly modern ILC, with a 24MP sensor, 10 fps continuous shooting and 4K/30p video capture.

Compared to the TL2, the CL offer more conventional handling, including twin exposure dials, physical buttons for menu and playback, and a 4-way controller. It also features a high-resolution 2.36 million-dot EVF built in. Despite the more traditional ergonomics, the CL's rear LCD is touch-sensitive, and supports swipe gestures for image navigation and mode switching.

The CL is being launched alongside a new Elmarit-TL 18mm F2.8. At just 20.5mm/0.8in in length, Leica calls the "smallest wide-angle APS-C pancake lens currently available in the market."

Pricing for the CL and the new 18mm follows below:

  • Body only, black anodized finish : $2,795.00
  • Leica CL Prime Kit with 18 mm : $3,795.00
  • Leica CL Vario Kit with 18-56 mm : $3,995.00
  • Elmarit-TL 18 F2.8 ASPH, black / silver anodized : $1,295.00

Press release

Leica Camera Unveils Expansion of its APS-C System with the New Leica CL and Smallest Wide-Angle APS-C Lens

The new mirrorless camera and lens unite innovation, ease of use and compact design for exceptional visual storytelling

November 21, 2017- Leica Camera unveils the latest addition to its APS-C system with the Leica CL, a new camera that boasts an exceptional balance of state-of-the-art technology, mechanical precision and intuitive, classic design to make it the ideal everyday companion, a perfect fit for all types of photography. With stunning image quality – even in low-light scenarios – new electronic viewfinder technology and superb video capabilities, the Leica CL is the ultimate tool to capture everyday moments, all customizable to the photographer’s style. Available on its own or in two new camera-and-lens kit options, the Leica CL makes it simple to incorporate the art of photography into one’s daily life.

Alongside the Leica CL, the iconic photography brand is further diversifying the APS-C system’s portfolio of lenses by introducing the Elmarit-TL 18 mm f/2.8 ASPH., the smallest-in-class wide-angle lens with supreme imaging performance.

Evolution of the Leica APS-C system portfolio
With the launch of the Leica CL, the Leica APS-C System now encompasses two remarkable camera models, the Leica CL and the Leica TL2. In technical terms, the two cameras are equals, but retain stark differences in regards to their design and handling. The Leica CL reflects the traditions of Leica with its iconic industrial design, classic physical button controls and dials, while the Leica TL2 embodies a futuristic look, featuring a touchscreen and full-body aluminium. Coupled with the extensive portfolio of lenses, the Leica CL and Leica TL2 make for a formidable system portfolio offering an array of specialized and distinct photographic experiences.

Introducing the Leica CL
The Leica CL is rooted in Leica’s legacy, calling upon the brand’s heritage look with modern technical features. The instinctual and convenient design of the camera features a user-friendly handling concept, providing for an exceptionally intuitive tool whose compact size and light weight allow for maximum mobility. All essential controls are located on its top plate with just two dials for setting the aperture, shutter speed, ISO value, exposure compensation and shooting mode, for quick and intuitive handling. Keeping convenience at the forefront, all relevant shooting information is viewable on the small LCD screen atop the camera, instantly providing settings and exposure parameters at a glance.

Another outstanding feature of the Leica CL is its built-in electronic viewfinder. With EyeRes® technology developed by Leica specifically for this camera, the viewfinder enables a top-tier viewing experience. Most notable among a number of advantages of the built-in EVF, is the ability to preview the brightness and color of the final image before the shutter release is fully depressed, allowing photographers to always be in control over the composition and exposure.

Alongside an impeccable view of your subjects, the Leica CL offers best-in-class image quality. In combination with the high-resolution, 24 MP, APS-C format sensor of the Leica CL, a Maestro II series processor and fast autofocus system with 49 AF points guarantee brilliant photographs in all situations, including low-light scenes. In addition to being an impressive still-picture camera, the Leica CL also captures striking video at a resolution of up to 4K at 30 frames per second.

Keeping connectivity as a top priority, the Leica CL is equipped with an integrated Wi-Fi module allowing photographers to quickly and easily share their stunning photos and videos by email or on social networks with the Leica CL App for iOS or Android. The remote function of the app also provides the capability for mobile devices to be used as an off-camera remote viewfinder, allowing control of exposure parameters, including when shooting with the self-timer function or from unusual angles.

Thanks to the L-Bayonet mount shared by the Leica TL- and SL-Systems, SL-Lenses can also be used without an adapter on the CL and the TL2. Appropriate adapters are also available for using Leica M- and R-Lenses on the cameras, offering unparalleled creative flexibility and making the Leica CL one of the most versatile cameras in the Leica portfolio.

New Leica Elmarit-TL 18 mm f/2.8 ASPH.
To complement the Leica APS-C system, Leica is expanding the impressive TL lens portfolio with a ground-breaking new lens. Compact and lightweight, the new Elmarit-TL 18 mm f/2.8 ASPH. holds the title as the smallest wide-angle APS-C pancake lens currently available in the market. When mounted to the Leica CL, the camera and prime lens are small enough to fit into a coat pocket or small handbag – providing incredible images everywhere you go. Despite being just 20.5mm (less than one inch) in total length, the lens sacrifices nothing, providing the unrivalled imaging performance all Leica lenses are known for. Travel photography is easy with this light and dynamic lens, especially when paired with the Leica CL.

As a whole, the Leica APS-C System portfolio of lenses offer exceptionally high picture quality and infinite opportunities for creative photography. In addition to the Elmarit-TL 18 mm f/2.8 ASPH., the selection of lenses currently includes three zoom lenses (Super-Vario-Elmar-TL 11-23 mm f/3.5-4.5 ASPH., Vario-Elmar-TL 18-56 mm f/3.5-5.6 ASPH. and the APO-Vario-Elmar-TL 55-135 mm f/3.5-4.5 ASPH.) as well as three prime lenses (Summicron-TL 23 mm f/2 ASPH., Summilux-TL 35 mm f/1.4 ASPH. and the APO-Macro-Elmarit-TL 60 mm f/2.8 ASPH.).

All bundled up
To make the stunning new Leica CL more easily accessible to both new and current Leica fans looking to make their first step into the APS-C system, the Leica CL will be offered in two bundle options alongside an accompanying lens. The “Prime Kit” will include the new Elmarit-TL 18 mm f/2.8 ASPH lens, while the “Vario Kit” option includes the Vario-Elmar-TL 18-56 mm f/3.5-5.6 lens, allowing photographers to get into this new camera and growing system with a lens that best suits their photography style in an easy-to-grab kit.

Availability
The Leica CL and Leica Elmarit-TL 18 mm f/2.8 ASPH will both be available from Leica stores, boutiques and dealers at the end of November. The Leica CL body, in black anodized finish, will be $2,795.00 while the Prime and Vario Kits will be $3,795.00 and $3,995.00 respectively. The new Leica Elmarit-TL 18 mm f/2.8 ASPH, in black or silver anodized finish, will be $1,295.00.

Leica CL specifications PriceMSRP$2795 (body only), $3795 (w/18mm lens), $3995 (w/18-56mm lens)Body typeBody typeRangefinder-style mirrorlessBody materialMagnesium alloySensorMax resolution6014 x 4014Image ratio w:h3:2Effective pixels24 megapixelsSensor photo detectors25 megapixelsSensor sizeAPS-C (23.6 x 15.7 mm)Sensor typeCMOSProcessorMaestro IIColor spacesRGBColor filter arrayPrimary color filterImageISOAuto, 100-50000White balance presets5Custom white balanceYes (2 slots)Image stabilizationNoUncompressed formatRAWFile format
  • JPEG
  • Raw (DNG)
Optics & FocusAutofocus
  • Contrast Detect (sensor)
  • Multi-area
  • Center
  • Selective single-point
  • Single
  • Continuous
  • Touch
  • Face Detection
  • Live View
Autofocus assist lampYesNumber of focus points49Lens mountLeica LFocal length multiplier1.5×Screen / viewfinderArticulated LCDFixedScreen size3″Screen dots1,040,000Touch screenYesScreen typeTFT LCDLive viewYesViewfinder typeElectronicViewfinder coverage100%Viewfinder magnification0.74× (0.49× 35mm equiv.)Viewfinder resolution2,360,000Photography featuresMinimum shutter speed30 secMaximum shutter speed1/8000 secMaximum shutter speed (electronic)1/25000 secExposure modes
  • Program
  • Aperture priority
  • Shutter priority
  • Manual
Scene modes
  • sport
  • portrait
  • landscape
  • night portrait
  • snow/beach
  • fireworks
  • candlelight
  • sunset
  • digiscoping
  • miniature
  • panorama
  • HDR
Built-in flashNoExternal flashYes (via hot shoe)Flash X sync speed1/180 secDrive modes
  • Single
  • Continuous low/med/high
  • Interval
  • Exposure bracketing
Continuous drive10.0 fpsSelf-timerYes (2 or 12 secs)Metering modes
  • Multi
  • Center-weighted
  • Spot
Exposure compensation±3 (at 1/3 EV steps)AE Bracketing±3 (3 frames at 1/3 EV steps)Videography featuresFormatMPEG-4, H.264Modes
  • 3840 x 2160 @ 30p, MP4, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 60p, MP4, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1920 x 1080 @ 30p, MP4, H.264, Linear PCM
  • 1280 x 720 @ 30p, MP4, H.264, Linear PCM
MicrophoneStereoSpeakerMonoStorageStorage typesSD/SDHC/SDXC card (UHS-II supported)ConnectivityHDMINoMicrophone portNoHeadphone portNoWirelessBuilt-InWireless notes802.11b/g/nRemote controlYes (via smartphone)PhysicalEnvironmentally sealedNoBatteryBattery PackBattery descriptionBP-DC12 lithium ion battery & chargerBattery Life (CIPA)220Weight (inc. batteries)403 g (0.89 lb / 14.22 oz)Dimensions131 x 78 x 45 mm (5.16 x 3.07 x 1.77″)Other featuresOrientation sensorYesTimelapse recordingYesGPSNone
Categories: Photo News

Leica CL: first sample images

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 06:00
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The Leica CL is a 24MP rangefinder-style mirrorless camera, which sits alongside the TL2 in the company's APS-C lineup. We've been using one for a few days, with the brand new Elmarit-TL 18mm F2.8 pancake prime. Check out our gallery of images.

See our Leica CL sample gallery

Categories: Photo News

The Leica CL is (almost) what the TL should have been

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 06:00
Hands-on with Leica CL

'What has been is what will be, and what has been done is what will be done, and there is nothing new under the sun.'

If you know your Bible (which I must admit I don't – I had to look this phrase up to get the exact wording) you'll know that this oft-quoted proverb comes from Ecclesiastes 1:9. In a year that saw the commercial release of new versions of the Summaron 28mm F5.6 and Thambar 90mm F2.2, it may appear that that Leica's product planners have been a bit stuck on this passage of late.

With the release of the CL, a casual observer with a decently long memory might assume that the company's retro obsession has struck again, but not so fast...

Hands-on with Leica CL

While it shares a name with one of Leica's most popular and affordable cameras of the 1970s, the new CL is separated from its namesake by more than just years. It's digital for starters, and shares a lot of its core specification with the 24MP TL2, while offering a more conventional handling experience and a built-in viewfinder, in a body similar in size to the X2 (or depending on your era and preferred frames of reference, the IIIG).

We've been using Leica's newest mirrorless interchangeable lens camera for a little while now – click through for our first impressions and a deeper look at the CL's feature set.

Control Interface

The T/L and TL2 are beautiful cameras, but their touchscreen-focused user interfaces take some getting used to, and to be completely honest I never got used to them. The CL offers a more conventional handling experience which after extended use, I'd describe as being a hybrid of the TL2 and the Leica M10.

The twin control dials on the top of the camera serve as the main controls for exposure adjustment, and each has a switch at its center, which enables the dial function to be modified. Whether or not you get on with these dials is probably down to personal preference, but I really wish that one of them was on the front of the camera, for operation with my index finger (rather than my thumb).

Top LCD screen

Nestled between the twin control dials is the tiniest LCD I've seen since the Ricoh GR1. At 128 x 58px it serves as a basic status display for current exposure settings, and it automatically illuminates in low light (very handy).

Electronic viewfinder

Another very welcome addition to the CL compared to the T-series is a built-in viewfinder. Adding an accessory finder to the TL/2 is entirely possible, and makes the cameras more versatile, but it also makes them a lot bulkier. Plus the black Visoflex finder isn't a good aesthetic match for the brushed aluminum cameras, and Leica owners care about that sort of thing.

Electronic viewfinder

The CL's viewfinder isn't completely flush with the top of the camera, but the slight bump (rather reminiscent of the Olympus PEN-F) doesn't add much bulk, and the high resolution (2.36MP) and good magnification (0.74X equiv.) provide a crisp, clear view. Eye-relief is a sunglasses-friendly 20mm and a poppable-lockable +/-4 diopter is on hand for wearers of prescription eyeglasses.

Rear touch screen

The CL's 3", 1.04 million-dot rear LCD is fixed, and touch-sensitive. Unlike the TL2 however, the CL's conventional button and dial interface means that the touchscreen is by and large an optional, rather than integral part of the handling experience.

I say 'by and large' because I have had cause to curse the CL's touchscreen on several occasions since I've been using the camera. In touch AF mode, the CL works as you'd expect it to. You hold the camera out in front of you and touch the screen, and the AF point is positioned at the spot you just touched. But if you then raise the camera to your eye, especially if you're shooting vertically, it is more or less guaranteed that your nose will reposition the AF point to the very top of the image. This is the kind of operational quirk that I associate with earlier, more primitive touch implementations, and it is hugely annoying.

While it is easy to steer clear of touch-AF and touch-shutter modes through the AF mode menu settings, there is unfortunately no way to disable swipe gestures and image review scrolling and zooming touch features. More than a few times I have found myself accidentally 'swiping' (read: lightly brushing) the screen from the right which switches the CL into movie mode.

Swipe gestures

The trouble is that once you're in movie standby mode: a) you might not actually realize at first, which is confusing and b), assuming you got there accidentally, it is far from obvious how to get back to normal stills mode. The first couple of times I encountered this issue (bear in mind that I didn't have access to a user manual) I actually gave up and did a hard reset to factory settings just to get back to the business of taking pictures.

When I raised the issue with our contact at Leica, he informed me that a long touch followed by a swipe on the left of the screen switches back to stills mode. He also reminded me that the button in the center of the leftmost control dial can be used to switch between exposure modes (including movie).

This is all well and good, but I really wish it was possible to disable the swipe gestures altogether.

24MP sensor

The CL's sensor is a 24MP APS-C Bayer-type, without an AA filter. Leica claims 14 stops of dynamic range, which seems about right given the ~40MB Raw files (bearing in mind that we're not allowed to lab test this early production sample). JPEG image quality is exactly what I'd expect after using the TL2, and compares well to competitive 24MP APS-C cameras.

Alongside Ricoh (and Samsung, RIP) Leica is one of the few companies to offer Raw shooting in the .DNG format, which is always good to see – and makes shooting pre-production sample galleries for DPReview much easier. Perhaps as an indication of its enthusiast/semi-pro pretensions, when you reset the CL to factory settings (which as previously noted I have done, more than once) it defaults to RAW + JPEG capture.

Disappointingly, but not surprisingly at this point, the CL offers neither in-camera stabilization nor automatic sensor cleaning. Since like many mirrorless cameras the CL's sensor is fully exposed when the lens is removed from the camera, dust can (and in my experience does) get into your pictures unless you're very careful.

Mechanical + E-shutter

The CL's shutter is a hybrid mechanical/electronic type. It is fully mechanical to 1/8000sec, and fully electronic up to an equivalent shutter duration of 1/25,000sec. A full-time 'silent' E-shutter mode is also available, but interestingly, electronic first-curtain shutter is not an option. I haven't seen any evidence of noticeable shutter-shock during my shooting so far, but we'll be sure to test this in the lab once we receive a reviewable camera.

The CL's maximum shooting rate is a respectable 10fps, with focus locked. Leica claims that this performance is thanks to the new shutter, in combination with the CL's Maestro II image processor – the same generation processor (though not necessarily the same chip) that we've seen used in the TL2 and M10.

4K / 30p, 1080/60p

The CL is the second camera in the L-mount lineup (after the TL2) to offer 4K video capture, at 30p. Overall, despite the headline 4K mode the CL's video feature set is pretty unremarkable. 4K/24p capture is not possible, and with no microphone socket, videographers are limited to in-camera microphones for audio recording. The microphones are visible in this image, just forward of the CL's hotshoe.

Battery

The CL uses the same Panasonic-manufactured BP-DC12 battery as the Q, and offers an unremarkable CIPA rating of between 220-240 shots per charge. In normal use I've found that (unsurprisingly) this rating is conservative, but for people who regularly shoot a lot of video, I'd definitely recommending bringing a spare – especially if you're planning on being away from a charger for a while.

Part of the reason I say this is that the CL does not feature a USB socket and as such, there's no option for USB charging, which is a shame.

New 18mm pancake lens

The L-series lens lineup is still relatively small, but it grows slightly with the addition of the Elmarit 18mm F2.8 pancake prime – the lens that was mostly attached to the front of the CL during my time with the camera.

New 18mm pancake lens

The Japanese-manufacturered Elmarit is tiny at only 20.5mm (0.8in) in length and lightweight at only 80g (2.8oz), but makes up for its skinny dimensions with a big fat price-tag. The 18mm F2.8 will be available in black or silver, either on its own for $1295 or in a kit with the CL.

M-Adapter L

The Leica CL is also fully compatible with the M-Adapter L, which enables virtually any M-mount (and most L-mount, via an additional adapter) lenses to be used with a 1.5X crop. Modern M-mount lenses with 6-bit coding can be 'read' by the CL, allowing for in-camera profile corrections to be applied.

This is my battered old 5cm F1.5 Summarit, which becomes a battered old 7.5cm equiv., when mounted on the CL.

Final thoughts (for now)

On balance, the Leica CL is a nicely-designed camera that is pleasant to use. It's not perfect, but compared to the T/L and TL2 that came before it, it's more practical for everyday photography and easier to get to grips with. The built-in viewfinder is excellent, and I appreciate the more or less conventional button-and-dial interface, and the straightforward, M10-inspired menu. Less convincing is the touchscreen implementation. While the ability to set focus by touch in some AF modes, and scroll through / zoom into images in playback is really handy, the frequent problem of the AF point being repositioned by my nose, and the 'always on' swipe functionality did frustrate me.

Image quality from the CL's 24MP sensor seems excellent, although I'm not wholly convinced by the 18mm lens. During my time with the CL I've used it almost exclusively with the new 18mm F2.8 pancake, and I can't deny that it's a pretty powerful combination – as well as being truly pocketable. Unfortunately, off-center sharpness isn't as good as I would hope from a $1200+ prime, and the ~F4 aperture (in 35mm terms) limits its usefulness for low light photography, or anything where you might want a modicum of foreground/background separation.

That said, there are other, very good quality lenses in Leica's T-mount lineup, and the CL will play very well with all of them, albeit at the expense of some pocketability.

What do you think of the new Leica CL? Let us know in the comments.

Categories: Photo News

Top 10 sample galleries of the year #4: the Leica M10

DP Review Latest news - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 04:00
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We're counting down our top 10 most popular sample galleries of 2017. Images in these galleries have been viewed over a million times by you, our readers. In fact, our #4 gallery received a total of 1.4 million views – and it belongs to the Leica M10.

Pricey as it is, this camera is both capable of excellent image quality and really enjoyable to shoot with – read our first impressions review. We think it's the best digital Leica ever made and one heck of a travel companion. Barney brought it along with him to explore Japan and came back with many of the images shown above.

Top 10 most popular sample galleries of 2017

#10: Sigma 14mm F1.8 Art
#9: Fujifilm GFX 50S
#8: Nikon D7500
#7: Olympus Tough TG-5
#6: Sigma 85mm F1.4
#5: Fujifilm X-T20
#4: Leica M10
#3: To be revealed on 11/22
#2: To be revealed on 11/23
#1: To be revealed on 11/24

Categories: Photo News

TCL S305 series Roku TV (2017) review - CNET

CNET Reviews - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 16:35
With the TCL S305 series you're not paying extra for 4K resolution you can't see, or extras you'll never use. It's just a great streaming set for smaller rooms.
Categories: Photo News

Samsung WF45M5500AZ review - CNET

CNET Reviews - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 16:29
Samsung's $999 WF45M5500AZ front-load washing machine cleans well -- and looks good doing it.
Categories: Photo News

Sigma's high-end Art lenses get $100 Black Friday discount

DP Review Latest news - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 12:35

Sigma has announced its Black Friday sale, and fans of the company's high-end Art line will want to pay attention. This 'unprecedented' Art sale takes up to $100 off both prime and zoom Art models, and runs from now until November 30th.

Buyers will need to order the lenses through Sigma's website or shop through a Sigma authorized dealer in the US to get the discounted pricing.

The Black Friday sale covers eight prime and five zoom Art lenses (below), plus the MC-11 mount converter. All of the lenses are discounted by $100, with the exception of the 30mm F1.4 | Art lens, which is only discounted by $50. The lens converter is also discounted by $100.

Here's the list of all 13 lenses on discount starting today:

High-Performance Art Prime lenses

  • 14mm F1.8 DG HSM Art ($1,599 Retail Price) World’s First F1.8 Ultra-Wide Angle - $100.00 off
  • 20mm F1.4 DG HSM Art ($899 Retail Price) Bright & Sharp Wide-Angle - $100.00 off
  • 24mm F1.4 DG HSM Art ($849 Retail Price) Front Filter Compatible, Fast-Aperture Wide Angle - $100.00 off
  • 30mm F1.4 DC HSM Art ($499 Retail Price) A Low-Light Pro for APS-C - $50.00 off
  • 35mm F1.4 DG HSM Art ($899 Retail Price) A Groundbreaking Flagship Wide-Angle - $100.00 off
  • 50mm F1.4 DG HSM Art ($949 Retail Price) Redesigned for High Megapixel DSLRs - $100.00 off
  • 85mm F1.4 DG HSM Art ($1,199 Retail Price) Award-Winning Ultimate Portrait Lens - $100.00 off
  • 135mm F1.8 DG HSM Art ($1,399 Retail Price) Award-Winning Prime with Reach - $100.00 off

Versatile Premium Art Zooms Lenses

  • 12-24mm F4 DG HSM Art ($1,599 Retail Price) Ultra-Wide Zoom Excellence - $100.00 off
    18-35mm F1.8 DC HSM Art ($799 Retail Price) The First and Fastest of its Kind - $100.00 off
  • 24-35mm F2 DG HSM Art ($999 Retail Price) Prime Performance, Zoom Versatility - $100.00 off
  • 24-105mm F4 DG OS HSM Art ($899 Retail Price) Exceptional Usability for High-Resolution Cameras - $100.00 off
  • 50-100mm F1.8 DC HSM Art ($1,099 Retail Price) Larger Aperture and Long Reach for your APS-C Sensor - $100.00 off
Categories: Photo News

DJI AeroScope demo shows drone tracking tech in action

DP Review Latest news - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 11:55

In October, DJI introduced a new technology called AeroScope that makes it possible for law enforcement and other officials to track drones that broadcast info. The system was launched to address growing concerns about drones being operated in forbidden locations, such as near airports or over wildfires. AeroScope works by picking up telemetry and ID data broadcast by DJI drone.

The Verge recently shared a video showing AeroScope in action.

The system, which is a box-shaped device that includes a touchscreen display, issues an alert when it detects a drone nearby. Officials can pull up the ID and telemetry info the drone is broadcasting and potentially use that to identify the operator. A explained in the video, AeroScope shows the operator's email address, which officials can message for direct contact.

Speaking to DIY Photography, DJI said that email addresses were displayed to users in a beta version of the AeroScope software, and that such abilities won't be included in the final version.

There are some limitations to the AeroScope system. For example, drones that aren't registered won't provide info that helps officials identify the operator. As well, the system is localized, meaning it can only detect drones within a couple miles of the device. DJI previously explained that it chose this localized tracking method to prevent drone data from being easily amassed in government databases.

Categories: Photo News

Moment releases new case and lenses for Apple iPhone X

DP Review Latest news - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 10:12

Moment has launched a new photography case and lenses for the iPhone X, all of them currently listed for preorder on the company's website. The protective case, which is simply called Photo Case, is black with a canvas or optional walnut wood backing, and is joined by wide-angle, macro, super fisheye, and telephoto lens options.

The lenses attached directly to the Photo Case.

Moment's system gives the iPhone X—and select other phones—a sort of interchangeable lens system, enabling photographers to quickly attach and remove various lenses to the device as needed. The Photo Case doubles as a slim protective case, featuring microsuede on the inside, a thin rubberized body, and support for an optional wrist strap.

The lenses, meanwhile, are made with glass and feature Moment's new bayonet system for locking the lens to the case. Moment explains that its lenses are durable due to the use of "aerospace grade metal" and a unique hardening process. The company offers a 12-month warranty for their lenses.

The Moment for iPhone X is available to preorder at the following prices:

  • Photo Case: $30
  • Wide Lens: $100
  • Superfish Lens: $90
  • Macro Lens: $90
  • Tele Lens: $100
Categories: Photo News

Sigma releases full-res sample photos captured with 16mm F1.4 DC DN lens

DP Review Latest news - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 09:52

The new Sigma 16mm F1.4 DC DN | Contemporary lens made for APS-C E-Mount and M43 cameras has a lot of crop-sensor shooters very intrigued. Sigma says this lens boasts quality on par with its Art lens lineup, and our own hands-on at PPE 2017 was very positive. But before you order the lens—which ships at the end of this month and costs a very tempting $450—you'll want to check out the gallery below.

Sigma Global has finally released official, full-resolution sample photos captured with the new lens. Despite the lens being made primarily for APS-C E-Mount, Sigma shooter Wataru Nakamura used a Sony A7RII to capture these samples in the camera's 3:2 crop mode (17.8MP resolution).

Check them out for yourself below, or head over to the Sigma Global website to download the samples yourself:

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Categories: Photo News

Vimeo adds support for 8K 10-bit HDR videos

DP Review Latest news - Mon, 11/20/2017 - 09:15

Vimeo has announced the arrival of HDR to its streaming video platform, making it possible to upload and view up to 8K HDR 10-bit content containing more than one billion colors. Though many monitors and TVs aren't capable of displaying this type of content, an increasing number of consumer devices are, such as the iPhone X and Galaxy S8 smartphones.

Vimeo announced the expanded support last Thursday, explaining that it is the only video hosting platform that offers HDR content to the iPhone X, iPad Pro, and Apple TV 4K (take that YouTube). The support for 10-bit content means being able to display 1 billion colors versus 16 million, which should help eliminate color banding.

Videos that take advantage of this new support are able to present more than 75% of the colors a human eye can perceive, a huge jump from the typical 35% range. "Expect to see details on HDR for more codecs (like VP9) in the upcoming year," the company explained in a blog post. Vimeo offers in-depth details about its technology in the video below:

Categories: Photo News

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